corrosion consultancy,corrosion courses,corrosion expert witness

Home | Consulting | Training | Expert Witness | Failure Analysis | Design Review | Corrosion Test | Corrosion Software | Coatings | Materials | CP | >>>


 

ACE: Apps for Corrosion Engineers
- Making Your Life Easier, in Labs and in Fields  

 

Version 9.18

 

    Performance        Functionality        Usability

 

     

Anytime       Anywhere      Any Device      Any OS
No USB dongles     No installation       No Browser Plug-ins


Why WebCorr | Performance Guarantee | Unparalleled Functionality | Unmatched Usability | Any Device Any OS | Free Training & Support | CorrCompass


 

Features and Functions of ACE - Apps for Corrosion Engineers

 


ACE Overview | CRU | REF | CP-Pol | DO | Metallurgy | FER | PWHT | FAC | CRA | MMM | EMF | GSeries | PTable | GUC


ACE is a collection of essential corrosion software applications for use by corrosion engineers, corrosion researchers, and corrosion technicians in laboratories and in fields. ACE can significantly increase the efficiency, productivity, consistency and accuracy of corrosion related calculations, conversions, CP survey data assessment, materials selection, and corrosion prediction.

 

Figure 1 below shows the screen shot of ACE. There are 10 modules under the respective Tabs in ACE.

  • CRU: Corrosion Rate Unit Converter - Converting between all corrosion rate units for all metals and alloys.

  • REF: Reference Electrode Potential Converter - Converting measured potentials at measurement temperatures to equivalent potentials at 25oC vs. reference electrodes commonly used in labs and in fields.

  • CP-Pol: Cathodic Polarization Assessment and Corrosion Rate Calculation - Assessing the effect of CP polarization on the corrosion rate when CP is ON. This software tool can be used to optimize cathodic protection design, to determine cathodic protection criteria, and to evaluate CP survey data.

  • DO: Dissolved Oxygen Calculator - Calculation of dissolved oxygen in water at a specified temperature (oxygen solubility, oxygen saturated waters), calculation of diffusion limiting current density, prediction of the maximum oxygen corrosion rate.

  • Metallurgy: Assessing the Effect of Metallurgy on Corrosion
    There are 4 sub-modules under the metallurgy Tab:

    ACE-FER: Ferrite Content Predictor - Determining the ferrite content in cast stainless and alloys and the resistance to stress corrosion cracking.

    ACE-PWHT: Post-Weld Heat Treatment - Predict the equivalent carbon content and the requirement for pre-heating or post-weld heat treatment.

    ACE-FAC: Flow-Accelerated Corrosion - Predict the resistance to flow-accelerated corrosion.

    ACE-CRA: Corrosion Resistant Alloys - Predict the pitting resistance equivalent number (PREN) of corrosion resistant alloys, predict the application limits for temperature and chloride concentration.

  • MMM: Mole and Molar Mass Calculator/Converter - Calculating/Converting mole and molar mass for all compounds.

  • EMF: Electromotive Force Series - Table of Standard Potentials at 25oC.

  • GSeries: Galvanic Series - Table of Galvanic Series in Natural Sea Water.

  • PTable: Periodic Table of Elements

  • GUC: General Units Converter - Converting between metric and English units. 

Figure 1 Overview of ACE - Apps for Corrosion Engineers

 

Detailed Feature Description of Apps for Corrosion Engineers

CRU: Corrosion Rate Unit Converter - Converting between All Corrosion Rate Units for All Metals and Alloys

Corrosion rate units commonly reported in the corrosion literature include:

  • micro-ampere per cm2: A/cm2,

  • milli-inch per year: mpy,

  • micrometer per year: m/y,

  • millimeter per year: mm/y,

  • gram per m2 per day:  gmd,

  • milligram per dm2 per day: mdd

Converting the corrosion rate from one unit to another for comparison and for engineering applications is frequently required for numerous metals and alloys. For a given alloy, the conversion factors are different for each unit (A/cm2, mpy, m/y, mm/y, mdd, gmd); for a given unit conversion (e.g. mdd => mpy), the conversion factors are different for different alloys which are influenced by the density, chemical compositions, atomic mass of elements, and the valence of metallic elements in the alloy. Manual conversion requires multiple steps of calculation using a set of equations. The procedure is time-consuming and prone to errors, particularly for many engineering alloys that contain multiple metallic elements in their chemical compositions. Try to manually convert a corrosion current density of 1 A/cm2 to mm/y for the titanium alloy Ti-3Al-8V-6Cr-4Mo-4Zr and see for yourself how long it takes you to get an accurate conversion.

 

ACE-CRU - Corrosion Rate Unit Converter is the only device and OS independent software tool on the market for instantly converting between all corrosion rate units for all metals and alloys with precision. Users simply choose the metal or alloy from the list and the conversion between all corrosion rate units for the selected alloy is instantly displayed (Figure 1). If a metal or alloy is not available in the database, users can easily define their own alloys for the conversion (Figure 2).

Figure 2 User-Defined Alloy in Corrosion Rate Units Converter

 

ACE-CRU Corrosion Rate Units Converter provides error-free conversion conforming to relevant ISO, ASTM and NACE standards.  Current database in ACE-CRU Corrosion Rate Units Converter contains the following metals and alloys:

 

Aluminum and Aluminium Alloys

Aluminum

AA1100 (A91100)
AA1199 (A91199)
AA2024 (A92024)

AA2060 (A92060)
AA2219 (A92219)
AA3003 (A93003)
AA3004 (A93004)
AA5005 (A95005)
AA5050 (A95050)
AA5052 (A95052)
AA5083 (A95083)
AA5086 (A95086)
AA5154 (A95154)
AA5357 (A95357)
AA5454 (A95454)
AA5456 (A95456)
AA6061 (A96061)
AA6062 (A96062)
AA6070 (A96070)
AA6101 (A96101)

AA7050 (A97050)
AA7072 (A97072)
AA7075 (A97075)
AA7079 (A97079)
AA7178 (A97178)

 

Copper and Copper Alloys
Copper

CDA110 (C11000)
CDA220 (C22000)
CDA230 (C23000)
CDA260 (C26000)
CDA280 (C28000)
CDA442 (C44200)
CDA443 (C44300)
CDA444 (C44400)
CDA510 (C51000)
CDA524 (C52400)
CDA608 (C60800)
CDA612 (C61200)
CDA655 (C65500)
CDA687 (C68700)
CDA706 (C70600)
CDA710 (C71000)
CDA715 (C71500)
CDA752 (C75200)

 

Stainless Steels and Alloys
201 (S20100)
202 (S20200)
302 (S30200)
304 (S30400)
304L (S30403)
304LN (S30453)
309 (S30900)
310 (S31000)
311 (S31100)
316 (S31600)
316L (S31603)
316LN (S31653)
317 (S31700)
317L (S31703)
317LMN (S31726)
321 (S32100)
329 (S32900)
330 (N08330)
347 (S34700)
410 (S41000)
430 (S43000)
446 (S44600)
502 (S50200)
254SMO (S31254)
654SMO (S32654)
Nicrofer 3228 NbCe (S33228)
Nicrofer 2509 Si7 (S70003)
Ferralium 255 (S32550)
Zeron 100 (S32760)
7Mo Plus (S32950)
2RE69 (S31050)
3RE60 (S31500)
44LN (S31200)
IN-744 (S31100)
Uranus 50 (S32404)
Uranus B66 (S31266)
DP-3W (S39274)
Monit (S44635)
2205 (S31803)
2304 (S32304)
2507 (S32750)
2707 HD (S32707)
Sea-Cure (S44660)

 

Nickel and Nickel Alloys
Nickel

200 (N02200)
400 (N04400)
600 (N06600)
Inconel 625 (N06625)
Incoloy 825 (N08825)
Hastelloy B (N10001)
Hastelloy B-2 (N10665)
Hastelloy C (N10002)
Hastelloy C-4 (N06455)
Hastelloy C-22 (N06022)
Hastelloy C-2000 (N02000)
Hastelloy C-276 (N10276)
Alloy 20 (UNS N08020)
Hastelloy G (N06007)
Hastelloy G-3 (N06985)
Hastelloy G-30 (N06030)
20Cb-3 (N08020)
20Mo-4 (N08024)
20Mo-6 (N08026)
Al-6X (N08366)
AL-6XN (N08367)
904L (N08904)
Allcorr (N06110)
Sanicro 28 (N08028)
Cronifer 1925 hMo (N08925)
Nicrofer 5923 hMo (N06059)
Inconel 686 (N06686)
Inconel 690 (N06690)
JS700 (N08700)

 

Carbon Steels, Cast Irons and Low Alloy Steels
Carbon Steels
Low Alloy Steels
Gray Cast Iron
Silicon Cast Iron

 

Titanium and Alloys
Titanium (unalloyed)
Ti-3Al-2.5V
Ti-5Al-2.5Sn
Ti-6Al-2Sn-4Zr-2Mo
Ti-6Al-6V-2Sn
Ti-6Al-4V
Ti-6Al-7Nb
Ti-5Al-2Zr-2Sn-4Mo-4Cr
Ti-6Al-2Sn-4Zr-6Mo
Ti-4.5Al-3V-2Mo-2Fe
Ti-4Al-4Mo-2Sn-0.5Si
Ti-10V-2Fe-3Al
Ti-3Al-8V-6Cr-4Mo-4Zr

 

Metals
Aluminium
Cadmium
Copper
Chromium
Iron
Lead
Molybdenum
Nickel
Silver
Gold
Palladium
Platinum
Tantalum
Tin
Titanium
Zinc
Zirconium

 

Magnesium and Magnesium Alloys

Magnesium
AZ63
AZ31
AZ33
AZ81
AZ91
AM60
AM50
AM20
AS41
AS21
ZK51
ZK61
ZE41
ZC63
EZ33
HK31
HZ32
QE22
QH21
WE54
WE43
M1
AZ31
AZ61
AZ80
ZM21
ZMC711
LA141
ZK31
ZK61
HK31
HM21
HZ11


User-Defined Alloy

Users can define their own alloy for the conversion by entering the chemical composition (wt%) of the metallic elements in the alloy. ACE-CRU Corrosion Rate Units Converter instantly displays the results of the conversion between all corrosion rate units, saving users' time and effort.

 

Application Example

Weight loss coupon test for magnesium alloy AZ61 reported a corrosion rate of 1.123 mdd.

What is the equivalent corrosion current density in uA/cm2?

What is the corrosion rate expressed in um/y?

What is the corrosion rate expressed in mpy?

Answers to the above are instantly available (Figure 3) after selecting the alloy AZ61 from the dropdown list and entering the weight loss data "1.123" in the "mdd" field:

The equivalent corrosion current density is 1.0472 uA/cm2.

The corrosion rate in um/y is 22.7844.

The corrosion rate in mpy is 0.897.

 

Figure 3 Converting Corrosion Rate for Magnesium Alloy AZ61


ACE Overview | CRU | REF | CP-Pol | DO | Metallurgy | FER | PWHT | FAC | CRA | MMM | EMF | GSeries | PTable | GUC


REF: Reference Electrode Potential Converter - Converting measured potentials at measurement temperatures to equivalent potentials at 25oC vs. reference electrodes commonly used in labs and in fields.

Figure 4 ACE-REF Reference Electrode Potential Converter with Temperature Correction

Corrosion laboratories worldwide use a variety of reference electrodes for specific reasons. National and International cathodic protection standards use different reference electrodes for specifying cathodic protection criteria. Copper copper-sulphate electrode (CSE) is specified for cathodic protection of underground structures such as pipelines and storage tanks; silver-silver chloride electrode (SSC) is specified for cathodic protection of structures immersed in seawater; saturated calomel electrode (SCE) is most widely used in laboratories. Electrode potentials are sensitive to temperature. Potentials measured at temperatures other than 25oC have to be converted to equivalent values for cross-referencing and comparison. For example, Cathodic protection potential survey data are collect in the fields at seasonal temperatures (not the standard 25oC). It is essential that the CP system meets the protection criteria that is referenced to -0.85 V (CSE) at 25oC for a buried pipeline. The ACE-REF module instantly converts the measured potential at the measurement temperature to the equivalent potential at 25oC on commonly used reference electrode scale, or an user-defined reference electrode scale.

Try to manually convert the potential of -0.850 V (CSE) measured at 45oC to the potential at 25oC on the SSC (SJ) scale and see how long it takes to get an accurate conversion. In ACE-REF, it take less than a second and the conversion is done for all common reference electrodes used in labs and in fields. In this example, the reading of -0.85 V (CSE) at 45oC does not meet the CP protection criteria as the equivalent potential at 25oC is -0.832 V (CSE), as shown in Figure 4 above. In contrast, a potential reading of -0.837 V CSE) at 10oC meets the cathodic protection criteria as the equivalent potential at 25oC is -0.850 V (CSE), as shown in Figure 5.

Figure 5 ACE-REF Reference Electrode Potential Converter for Cathodic Protection Applications

ACE-REF can literally be a life-saver for cathodic protection contractors, cathodic protection technicians, cathodic protection technologists who are involved in meeting both the technical and the contractual requirements of cathodic protection criteria. Facility owners can use ACE-REF to instantly verify if the CP survey data meet the protection criteria at a specific location and in a specific season.

Users of ACE-REF can easily define their own Reference Electrode scale for conversion. In Figures 4 and 5 above, the user-defined reference electrode named "User's Ref" has a standard potential of 0.288 V (SHE) at 25oC with a temperature coefficient of -0.433 mV/oC.


ACE Overview | CRU | REF | CP-Pol | DO | Metallurgy | FER | PWHT | FAC | CRA | MMM | EMF | GSeries | PTable | GUC 


CP-Pol: Cathodic Polarization Assessment and Corrosion Rate Calculation - Assessing the effect of CP polarization on the corrosion rate when CP is ON.

This software tool can be used to optimize cathodic protection design, to determine cathodic protection criteria, and to evaluate CP survey data.

Figure 6 CP-Pol: Assessing the effect of CP polarization on the corrosion rate when CP is ON.

An user simply enters the temperature and cathodic polarization, CP-Pol calculates the corrosion rate reduction factor. If the native corrosion rate (no CP) is known (typically less than 0.25 mm/y in soil or seawater), the corrosion rate when CP is on is calculated. CP-Pol allows users to enter the Tafel slope value for use in the computation. 


ACE Overview | CRU | REF | CP-Pol | DO | Metallurgy | FER | PWHT | FAC | CRA | MMM | EMF | GSeries | PTable | GUC  


DO: Dissolved Oxygen Calculator

This software tool helps you with the following tasks:

  • calculation of dissolved oxygen in waters and other aqueous process fluids at a specified temperature,
  • prediction of oxygen diffusion limiting current density,
  • prediction of the maximum oxygen corrosion rate for carbon steels.

Figure 7  Calculation of Dissolved Oxygen in Waters at a Specified Temperature.

Users have complete flexibility in defining the fluid by entering either the salinity, or conductivity, or TDS, or just select one of the waters without the need to have the water analysis results. 

Figure 8  Calculation of Dissolved Oxygen and O2 Diffusion Limiting Current Density in Waters at a Specified Temperature.

The solubility of oxygen in water is dependent on both temperature and salinity (salt concentration). The oxygen diffusion limiting current density and the corresponding corrosion rate in mm/y for carbon steels are predicted in this module. An user can use the CRU module to convert the diffusion limiting current density to the preferred corrosion rate unit for any metal or alloy.


ACE Overview | CRU | REF | CP-Pol | DO | Metallurgy | FER | PWHT | FAC | CRA | MMM | EMF | GSeries | PTable | GUC


Metallurgy: Predicting the Effects of Metallurgy on Corrosion

There are 4 sub-modules under the metallurgy Tab:

ACE-FER: Ferrite Content Predictor - Determining the ferrite content in cast stainless and alloys and the resistance to stress corrosion cracking.

An user can define customized alloy. ACE-FER predicts the ferrite content (%volume) in the cast microstructure and the resistance to stress corrosion cracking (SCC).

Figure 9 Assessing the Effect of Metallurgy on Corrosion

 

ACE-PWHT: Post-Weld Heat Treatment - Predict the equivalent carbon content (ECC) and the requirement for pre-heating or post-weld heat treatment.

ACE-FAC: Flow-Accelerated Corrosion - Predict the chromium equivalent and the resistance to flow-accelerated corrosion.

ACE-CRA: Corrosion Resistant Alloys - Predict the pitting resistance equivalent number (PREN) of corrosion resistant alloys, predict the application limits for temperature and chloride concentration.

MMM: Mole and Molar Mass Calculator/Converter - Calculating/Converting mole and molar mass for all compounds.

Figure 10 Mole and Molar Mass Calculator and Converter

The MMM module works for all elements in the periodic table and all compounds with known formulae.

EMF: Electromotive Force Series - Table of Standard Potentials at 25oC.

GSeries: Galvanic Series - Table of Galvanic Series in Natural Sea Water.

PTable: Periodic Table of Elements

GUC: General Units Converter - Converting between metric and English units. 


ACE Overview | CRU | REF | CP-Pol | DO | Metallurgy | FER | PWHT | FAC | CRA | MMM | EMF | GSeries | PTable | GUC


ACE - Apps for Corrosion Engineers. We Work Harder to Make Your Life Easier, in Labs and in Fields.

Home | Contact Us  |  PDF

Copyright 1995-2019. WebCorr Corrosion Consulting Services. All rights reserved.